The 2016 Samson Feldman Visiting Scholar – Bang Wong

Save the Date - Friday, April 15, 2016

The Lecture:

Art and Science:
A partnership catalyzing discovery in biomedicine

Friday, April 15, 2016
4:00 PM

Free Admission

Mountcastle Auditorium
Preclinical Teaching Building
725 North Wolfe Street
The Johns Hopkins University
School of Medicine
Baltimore

Reception to follow
Members of the scientific and art communities are cordially invited to attend

Synopsis:

The unprecedented scale and resolution of data generated by the biomedical research community hold tremendous potential to inform our understanding and treatment of disease. The challenge is to ensure that technical and non-technical researchers can access, use and learn from these data and analytics resources. Bang Wong will present examples of user-friendly analytical and visualization tools developed at the Broad Institute to advance research projects, including the Connectivity Map, with its 26 trillion point dataset.

BangWong2

Google Map to the Preclinical Teaching Building

Bang Wong, MA, MS

Bang Wong is the Creative Director of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. At the Broad he led the design and development of the DNAtrium, an exhibition space dedicated to the exploration of the human genome. His research focuses on developing visual strategies to meet the analytical challenges posed by the unprecedented scale, resolution, and variety of data in biomedical research. He also writes a monthly column for Nature Methods that deals with the fundamental aspects of visual presentation. Bang received a Masters degree in Immunology and a Masters degree in Medical Illustration both from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Bang’s Website

Data Visualization Initiative at the Broad Institute

DNAtriumData StreamScience in Action

The Samson Feldman Visiting Scholar and Lecturer

In Art as Applied to Medicine

Rossetta A. and Sadie B. Feldman, sisters of Samson Feldman, have established a visiting lectureship to honor his life as an artist and lifelong patron of the arts. Samson Feldman always believed in the everpresent relationship of art and science. It is appropriate to designate the field of art as related to medicine as the topic to which the lectures will be addressed. The lectures are to be selected from distinguished scholars in visual communications with the purpose of presenting contemporary views pertaining to medical art. The selection of lecturers will be made by a committee representing The Department of Art as Applied to Medicine.