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Last minute Portfolio Advice: when to add a “Detail” slide

Color Media © Li Yao

In the Portfolio, the faculty ask for 20 pieces of art, and they allow up to 4 “Detail” images. So, you’re already limited in how many extra images you can include. For the vast majority of the art submitted in all our admissions Portfolios, nearly 99% of it, a detail slide is not necessary. However, there are some rare Portfolio pieces where a detail image is effective and useful.

For example…

Here’s the Full image of a Hawk, created under direct observation of a preserved specimen, and a detail of the face (hint: use the web browser Back button to come back to the blog after opening each image).

Color Media © Li Yao

Color Media © Li Yao

Color Media © Li Yao

Color Media © Li Yao

 

 

Notice that the detail slide is a new optically zoomed-in capture of the detail area. This is NOT a re-sampling or cropping of the full image. So this “Detail” area maintains high resolution and isn’t blurry or pixelated.

Extensive work was put into the face of the Hawk. Highlights, line-work, different textures (beak, eye, short sharp feathers, longer fluffy feathers, etc.), all appear natural and realistic even with a distinct artistic style.

The artist is demonstrating an accomplished use of Watercolor.

 

Here’s another example this time a city-scape and a close-in detail of a portion of the original.

Color Media © Li Yao

Color Media © Li Yao

Color Media © Li Yao

Color Media © Li Yao

 

 

Again, the “Detail” image maintains high-resolution and avoids the blurry/pixelated look that can happen when cropping the full image down to an area of detail and then enlarging the crop. Always best to capture a new optically zoomed image when showing detail.

The area chosen for the detail image also shows different textures, good perspective and color, and extensive detail work from the moldings at the top of the building to the black-and-white bricks in the foreground.

The artist worked with markers on this piece and started with a direct observation sketch.

 

Though I don’t have an example to share, if you have a traditional 3D sculpture in your Portfolio, a second view point can be an excellent choice for a detail image (zoom-in not always necessary for this sort of detail image).

Advice in a nutshell? Be Judicious! Select which Portfolio piece(s) could benefit from a detail and what part of the piece warrants that detail the most.

If you have any last-minute questions, please contact us – medart-info@jhmi.edu.
I’ll be answering emails every day, and especially on the 15th!
Dacia

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